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CBD Oils & CBD Tinctures

A common misunderstanding in the cannabis industry is that CBD oil and tinctures are the same product. Although they are closely related, they have several distinct properties that differentiate the two. Both products can be extracted from either the hemp plant or the cannabis plant, sourced from the stalk or seed, but most often times and most importantly, the flower.
CBD OIL
CBD oil is typically extracted with propane, butane, or CO2, making it a thicker product with higher concentrations of cannabinoids, the natural chemical compounds that give patients their desired effects from cannabis. With this extraction method, more of the vitamins and nutrients are still intact, as well as other natural pieces of the plants such as proteins, chlorophyll, fatty acids, and flavonoids that all have their own quality to bring to CBD oil. CBD oil usually retains most of its original earthy, floral flavor because the way it holds onto all of these parts of the plant. Many people take their CBD oil orally for quickest onset, but it can also be ingested via capsule to be digested for an extended release because it is so thick. 
 
CBD TINCTURES
CBD tinctures, on the other hand, are typically extracted with alcohol or glycerin and are liquid at room temperature. Sometimes, to retain this liquidity, filler substances such as MCT oil (medium-chain triglyceride AKA refined coconut oil) are added. Some companies opt to add some flavoring to their tinctures for easier and tastier consumption, as this product is taken sublingually (under the tongue) or added to a beverage. 
Both CBD oil and CBD tinctures, when taken sublingually, the cannabinoids are sent into the bloodstream via the blood vessels underneath the tongue. Consumer experience will depend on the strength of the product, how much ingested, and the individual’s metabolism and body processes.  It never hurts to try both products to see which may be more effective for you.

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CBD for Dravet Syndrome – A 2017 Study

Dravet syndrome, previously known as severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI), is a severe form of epilepsy that typically develops around 6 months of age. Starting with frequent febrile seizures which are fever-related, seizures can be triggered by body temperature changes, flashing lights, emotional stress or excitement. As the disease progresses, the patient may develop myoclonic seizures, characterized by involuntary muscle spasms, and status epilepticus, a state of continuous seizure that lasts longer than 30 minutes and requires emergency care.
The high frequency of seizures caused by the syndrome commonly causes children to have trouble developing language and motor skills. In addition, they often experience hyperactivity and have problems with socialization. Dravet syndrome is typically treated with anticonvulsant medications and diet adjustment, with varying results from person to person. Seizures associated with Dravet syndrome are particularly difficult to control compared to other forms of epilepsy.
While there is no cure for Dravet syndrome, a 2017 study published in the New England Journal of Medicine demonstrated that cannabis might play a role in reducing seizures caused by Dravet syndrome. One of the major cannabinoids found in cannabis, cannabidiol (CBD), interacts with cannabinoid receptor 1 in the body’s endocannabinoid system, inhibiting the release of a certain neurotransmitter that causes seizures. The study, which is the largest and most successful clinical trial to-date to demonstrate the potential medicinal benefits of CBD, may convince many clinicians to consider CBD for treating the 20% of epileptic disorder that are poorly controlled by prescription drugs.
According to the National Institute of Health, CBD-enriched cannabis reduced seizure frequency in 85% of children and 14% reported complete seizure freedom. Children also saw improvements in sleep (53%), alertness (71%), and mood (63%). Furthermore, these benefits were achieved with minimal side effects.
CBD was approved for use in the treatment of Dravet syndrome in 2018, and studies continue to demonstrate its effectiveness. Tell us your experiences in the comments.